My Favorite Buildings By Gaudi Part I


Antoni Gaudí has become a universal figure in modern architecture. He broke all the established rules with never-before-seen building and structural systems, he created his own unique, unprecedented methodology and a style full of symbolism and detail.

Gaudí took over the Sagrada Família project in Barcelona when he was just 31 years old and he spent the last 12 years of his life completely devoted to his great vocation: serving God through architecture. Unfortunately, the bell tower dedicated to the apostle Barnabas was the only one Gaudí would see finished. In 1926 Gaudi dies and his disciple Domènec Sugranyes takes over the project but the temple is vandalized during the Spanish Civil War. The temple has been under construction and renovation for years and in 2021 all efforts focus on finishing the tower of the Virgin Mary, the Basilica’s second tallest at 138 meters.

Casa Batlló was not a new construction project, but rather the renovation of a building designed in 1877 by Gaudi’s teacher. Trencadís, a type decoration with of broken mosaic, is a fundamental element in Gaudí’s work, especially on the façade of Casa BatllóCreated through pieces of broken glass and tile, it was one of the architect’s preferred techniques.

Casa Vicens is the first important commission Antoni Gaudí received and sowed the beginning of all his architectural work. In 1883, Manel Vicens i Montaner, a stock and currency broker, hired the young architect for the design of his summer garden home. The most important source of inspiration in all Gaudí’s work is the world of nature, and Casa Vicens is one of the first examples.

One of the less known works of Gaudi is the Teresianas School . He conceived this school as an original Neo-Gothic castle and this imposing building has been used as a school ever since it opened. His interest in architectural work and religious devotion led him to accept more modest projects such as this school.

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